Diversity and Health Disparities

The Diversity and Health Disparities Cluster addresses health inequities among ethnic and racial minorities and other vulnerable populations through research, teaching and policy activity on deeply rooted social inequalities within our society that result in disproportionate rates of illness and death in marginalized groups. These social inequalities include persistent poverty; unequal access to decent jobs, education and housing; political disfranchisement; racial discrimination; and toxic living and working environments. The cluster includes two primary interest areas: (1) Neighborhoods and the social econoly of health disparities; and (2) Health, human rights, and social inequality. 

CLUSTER LEADER

Denise Herd
School of Public Health


“Eliminating health disparities is the key public health problem in the 21st century. Health disparities are fundamentally not biological problems, with bio-medical solutions, but grow out of deeply rooted inequalities in social and living conditions. As stated by one of the leaders in this field: ‘Your ZIP code is more important for your health than your genetic code.’ Our cluster aims to provide the research and training to tackle the underlying social causes creating the enormous health inequities that are a part of local and global societies.”

-Denise Herd


CLUSTER MEMBERS

Charles Briggs
Anthropology
Julian Chow
Social Welfare
Jason Corburn
City & Regional Planning
Cori Hayden
Anthropology
Seth M. Holmes 
Goldman School of Public Policy
Rucker Johnson
Goldman School of Public Policy
Malo Hutson
City & Regional Planning
Rachel Morello-Frosch
College of Natural Resources
Mahasin Mujahid
School of Public Health
Amani M. Nuru-Jeter
School of Public Health
Kurt Organista
Social Welfare
Lonnie Snowden
School of Public Health